Adaptation and Change (Part 3)

This is a four part series titled Adaption and Change. It examines the relation between BIM collaboration and traditional construction techniques. I hope that it will help some readers to gain an understanding of the underlying issues often present, but often overlooked in the process. I encourage all readers to read the series in the order of the postings to gain the fullest appreciation of the overall process. The four areas are: the cycles of adaption in construction (Part 1); the processes of BIM adaption being used (Part 2); the behavioral traits of BIM (Part 3); and ways to help make BIM work beyond the software limits (Part 4).

Some readers may find this information useful in its present form, and others may find it as a platform for new ideas towards implementing a BIM program of their own. As always, I encourage you the reader to leave your thoughts and opinions on the subject matter.

I’ll start part 3 with a very short story.

One Friday night, I was having a guest over for one of my famous spaghetti dinners and had I realize I was out of Parmesan cheese. I needed to go to the store and get back before they arrived. I got in my car and pull out of the driveway. I got to the stop sign at the end of my road, slowed down, glance, and notice a car down the road, but far enough so I didn’t have to stop and I kept rolling through the stop sign and stepped on the gas pedal.

On the way to my destination, there were a few places to pass the slower cars. So as I was accelerating to pass them; I realized that I had miss judged the distance needed to pass. I needed to make the next right turn into the parking lot entrance, or I’d have to go up the road and make a U-turn and come back, taking even more time. So I decide to accelerate a little more so I wouldn’t have to completely cutoff the cars I was passing. I quickly got back into the right lane, and make a quick right turn into the parking lot; I had made it. Continue reading

Adaption and Change (Part 2)

This is a four part series titled Adaption and Change. It examines the relation between BIM collaboration and traditional construction techniques. I hope that it will help some readers to gain an understanding of the underlying issues often present, but often overlooked in the process. I encourage all readers to read the series in the order of the postings to gain the fullest appreciation of the overall process. The four areas are: the cycles of adaption in construction (Part 1); the processes of BIM adaption being used (Part 2); the behavioral traits of BIM (Part 3); and ways to help make BIM work beyond the software limits (Part 4).

As seen in Part 1, adapting in construction has been happening for many years. (Dictionary.com, 2012 http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/adaptation) defines adaption as, “the ability of a…[company]… to survive in a particular ecological niche, especially because of alterations of form [and]or behavior brought about through natural selection.” So to survive, there needs to be a process of change to a company’s form and/or behavior. To gain an understanding of what needs to change; there will be a need to compare an older process and the two newer processes to asses the diffrences.
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Adaptation and Change (Part 1)

This is a four part series titled Adaption and Change. It examines the relation between BIM collaboration and traditional construction techniques. I hope that it will help some readers to gain an understanding of the underlying issues often present, but often overlooked in the process. I encourage all readers to read the series in the order of the postings to gain the fullest appreciation of the overall process. The four areas are: the cycles of adaption in construction (Part 1); the processes of BIM adaption being used (Part 2); the behavioral traits of BIM (Part 3); and ways to help make BIM work beyond the software limits (Part 4).

Today, new technologies such as BIM (Building Information Modeling) have been changing the face of construction at a pace in which many companies are left wondering if it is worth the investment and pain of adapting. By looking at past adaption cycles, one could see that the construction industry has been adapting to new technologies all along.
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